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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the fact is we went into a country to fight al qaeda who was all in the mountains in pakistan and even in the cities in pakistan, probably with the knowledge of the pakistani government. and we've wasted a lot of money and lives in an area where we didn't need to be, because that war will continue. there are only 100 al qaeda give or take left in afghanistan. but there are al qaeda in other spots in the middle east. and al qaeda's people have plotted terrorist activities from germany and from other places in europe. they don't need osama bin laden's base to have activity. there's nothing you need -- as far as the soviet union, the soviet union went down for goodly reasons, because of all the money they spent in afghanistan. true, we were there fighting them, but their attempt at gaining empire, which has been the loss of many empires, stretching too far and going beyond their supply lines, killed them. they spent money there and they'd like us to stay there. they're being real nice to us. they're helping us with bases, to bring in armaments and troops and supplies. come on, america. sp
in afghanistan, iraq and pakistan. while there is no immediate claim of responsibility, the u.s. officials say a handful of networks including an indian terrorist group may be behind the bombing. a senator with an intelligence background says the indian mujahadeen who want them to dominate the indian way of life is suspect. but they say the group is poorly organize and possibly had outside help, possibly from pakistani intelligence. >> with a dramatic attack like this, coordinated over three locations, it took money and it took planning. that always raises the speckor of the isi in pakistan. >> the three explosions at the mumbai opera house, jewelry district and major commuter hub drew comparisons to the mumbai attack in 2008. the ram pain that lasted for 60 hours killing 166 people was low-tech. it relied on ten pakistani militants armed with cell phone, handguns and back packs filled with explosives. the group l.e.t. linked to pakistani intelligence was blamed. >> the obvious question: is pakistan involved? i cannot think of any conceivable reason why pakistan would want to provoke a crisis
pakistan a strong message >> the pakistani relationship is difficult but it must be made to work overtime. but until we get through these difficulties, we will hold back some of the many that the american taxpayers have committed to give. >> some $800 million? >> yep. >> it's a lot of cash but is it a political move. our next guest called out the pakistani government in 2006 claiming they knew osama bin laden in's location. peter thompson joins me. he's the author of the new book "the wars of afghanistan." good to see you. >> thank you. >> i want to get your thoughts we reported that the half-brother of huh mean karzai in afghanistan has been assassinated. how does that affect the relationships? >> he was assassinated by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization
leaders in pakistan and yemen. >> i think we have them on the run. i think now is the moment. now is the moment following what happened with what happened to bin laden to put maximum pressure on them because, i do believe that if we continue this effort, that we can cripple al-qaida as a threat to this country. >> and the secretary's schedule in afghanistan is packed and first the meeting with the top u.s. commander general petraeus here and holding a face to face with afghan hamid karzai. they want to with draw 23,000 troops. >> david piper is on the phone from kabul. >> the newly appointed defense secretary arrive went straight in the talks with afghan president karzai and he said the draw down of u.s. troops. he hopes to drive the taliban to peace talks in that period so there can be a reconcilation in this country and the defense secretary w upbeat about killing out al-qaida. >> targeting the new al-qaida chief saw al-zawahri. he said the al-qaida leader may be just over the border in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas . general petraeus who leaves the post this month to lea
a pakistan on this particular trip. did he talk about what pakistan was not on his itinerary? guest: he did not talk about that specifically. it was very focused on afghanistan, but also on the border between afghanistan and pakistan. he did not say specifically why he did not go. i think it is pretty clear for a couple of reasons. the u.s. is trying to gauge just how much cooperation they can get from pakistan going forward. pakistan has a lot of u.s. trainers that have been working intensely with their special forces, and as a result of that, withheld some of the decade that went with them. they also repelled some of the partnership on the war on terrorism, so to speak. they are still trying to gauge that. for now, in the past, the key relationship between the u.s. and pakistan and the military have been between admiral mullen and his pakistan counterpart, the army chief of staff. i think that this point, the u.s. is still trying to weigh what they can do to move this cooperation forward with pakistan. host: the defense policy reporter a bloomberg news, thank you for being on the "washing
in pakistan. >> dave: they believe the head of al-qaeda is in pakistan al sar zawahiri. they said they're not happy with their actions and-- >> they're ratting us out when we go to the leaders. >> dave: they've kicked out military trainers. >> mike: it's hard to give money to people, maybe a segment of the pakistan military was harboring osama bin laden for goodness sake. >> ainsley: time for the headlines. two tennessee national guard members are dead after their helicopter goes down. the chopper crashed during a routine training flight. the chopper hit power lines on the way down, knocking out power to thousands of residents there as well. no word yet on the cause. the pilots were in an oh-58-d kiowa helicopter the subject of a lawsuit allegedly, alleging a faulty control system and fighter jets intercept two civilian planes near camp david where president obama is staying. it happened at separate times. both planes were escorted to nearby airports and they say the first plane had been out of radio communication. no word why the cessna got so close. the third time this month that pla
pakistan's minister for minorities condemned the blasphemy law, militants executed him in broad daylight. in egypt, as the gentleman from new jersey has stated, 23 men, women and children were killed in a bombing at an alexandria church in egypt on new year's eve, just last may, treekists attacked christians at a church in cairo, leaving 12 dead and hundreds wounded. we are fortunate -- i wish these were isolated cases but i could provide countless other examples from afghanistan to india to saudi arabia. we're fortunate to live in a country that was founded by religious refugees on principles of tolerance. but it is important that we do everything we can to ensure that religious minorities elsewhere in the world enjoy the freedoms and protections they deserve, the freedoms and protections enjoyed by all americans, appointing this special envoy will be an important step in that direction and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. smith: i yield such time
panetta went to iraq and afghanistan. he did not go to pakistan. i take that as a strong message. it is easy when you're in that region to attack on an extra couple of days for an important ally. i think that cross the minds of everyone who planned the trip. it was clearly a conscious decision not to go to pakistan. i think that is in part because when osama bin laden was killed on may 2 there was a list of things that we would ask the pakistan's to do, the pakistani to do, and i have not acted on any of them. this administration also put a hold on a $10 million in assistance. a great way to resolve that is sending the defense secretary to talk to folks about what is going on, but he did not. you are seeing already how differently the pentagon will treat allies in the region. "the in this morning's financial times" they had this headline -- guest: the withdrawal deadline is aggressive. they're talking about getting half of the troops out during the prime fighting season. they do not fight as much during the wintertime. we are starting to withdraw troops during a tumultuous situat
of deteriorating relations between the u.s. and pakistan. the pakinstani government now banning u.s. diplomats from leaving the capitol city without getting special permission first. the announcement made in a letter sent to the u.s. embassy in islamabad, the 1961 agreement allows them to move freely. the u.s. is working with pakistan to try to resolve this issue. >> arthel: a texas gun store's phone has been ringing off the hook since some quick thinking employees likely prevented a deadly attack. greg ebert of guns galore called police to report a suspicious customer last week. that customer was arrested the very next day, just miles from the fort hood army base with materials that could be used to make bombs. ever since, he and his co-workers have been getting inundated with phone calls, thanking them for their vigilance. guns galore is the same shop where nidal malik hasan purchased a weapon before opening fire on fort hood in 2009. >>> a gun heist in california, more than two dozen assault rifles ripped off from a supply store in fort irwin. it happened july 15. investigators say the thieves m
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
is in captivity. that's happened, for instance, in pakistan with a man named umar, a columnist, who was abducted and sexually assaulted. he was sodomized in retribution for his writing. >> warner: a lot of these victims at least the women, have never told their stories before to anyoee other than friends or family. why not? >> there are a number of reasons. the biggest one i heard from international correspondents was the fear of losing assignments. i have spoken to at least two journalists that told me that they were taken off assignments specifically because they came forward to talk about their sexual assault. so it really does happen. they don't want to be appear to be weak or vulnerable. women told me repeatedly that they had worked very hard to overcome this sense that they were the weaker gender in this profession and that them didn't feel that they could reveal that they had been raped without it making them look somehow more vulnerable.รงรง there are also.... >> warner: what about the local reporters? what were usually their reason for not saying anything? >> a lot of different cultura
in afghanistan because of the dangerous instability across the border in nuclear armed pakistan. but does anyone believe the war in afghanistan has made pakistan more safe? no, it has not. in fact, it's more fragile now than it's ever been. the threat from afghanistan is gone. bring the troops home. eugene robertson is not a conservative. we see him on tv all the time. and i will say that he nailed it with this editorial. the threat from afghanistan is gone, bring him home. mr. speaker, as i close always on the floor of the house, for these little girls, who have lost their father, and all the children who have lost their fathers and moms over in afghanistan and iraq, i ask god to please bless our men and women in uniform. i ask god to please bless the families of our men and women in uniform. i ask god in his loving arms to hold the families who have given a child dying for freedom in afghanistan and iraq. i ask god to please bless the house and senate we will do what is right in the eyes of god for his people. i ask god to give strength, wisdom, and courage to mr. obama he will do what is righ
based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been describe as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever's behind them, they've shown that india's largest city is still vulnerable. caroline hawley, bbc news. >>> the president and congressional negotiators return to the debt negotiations table today after yesterday's meeting ended in confrontation. those in the meeting said that president obama announced enough is enough, we have to be willing to compromise, before walking out of the room. the moody's rating service is threatening to downgrade the nation's credit rating because of this crisis. >> both sides really locking horns. >>> new light is being shed on the problem of american kids and obesity. and two harvard doctors are weighing in. >> what they're saying about overweight children has just about everybody taking sides on this. abc's lana zach explains the controversy. >> reporter: thanks, peggy and daniel. it's really a radical idea and it's intended to get people talking about childhood obesity. in "the journal of the american medical association," two
persecuted in places like pakistan, and we help christians who are suffering throughout the middle east. >> how do you do that? >> none of your business. >> isn't it anyone's business that donates to you? >> of course. but, you see, a lot of the times, if you disclose information of who you are helping, it ends up biting them. >> reporter: he leads us to his manager who was down the hall selling the anti-islam books. when cnn had questions about the high ranks on the board of advisers, he said to get the number from davies. >> can you tell us who they are? >> off the top of my head, yes. let me see. i am trying to think. the names have gone blank. they will come back to me in a second. major general -- ah, i can't -- the four-star -- there was a three-star general at the air force, irish name, thomas -- i usually know these by hearts. >> reporter: davies did come up with one name, a pilot but no contact details despite repeated requests from cnn. we made calls to the individual anyway, but he never called us back. the group's public tax forms lists only davies and a real estate develope
for heat as it said it sanctioned a journali journalist. his reports about links between pakistan's security agencies and muslim extremists. mullen said thursday he has not seen anything to, quote, disabuse the report that he knew about shazad's death. basically that means he thinks he knew but he didn't have proof. they call mullen's comments irresponsible. >>> tens of thousands of protestors poured into tehrer square in cairo today to pressure the government to slow reforms. some groups say they'll protest in the square for 18 days, which was the length of the revolution. >>> and there was tragedy at a texas rangers game. look at that video, that fan falling 20 feet to a concrete area behind the scoreboard at rangers ballpark. he was reaching for a ball thrown by rangers outfielder josh hamilton. the man was raisced to the hospital but he died. the rangers said their thoughts and prayers are with the man's family. a man was injured last year after falling about 30 feet trying to catch a foul ball. >>> they are willing to cut social security if republicans agree to increase taxes
. what was his connection to pakistan? there are so many unanswered questions about his overseas connections and what he was really doing and his radicalization during the process in which the military did nothing. and finally, the information the joint terrorism task force had about mr. al laak can i and communications with major hasan at fort hood. why wasn't it shared with general cohen at fort hood when it could have stopped the murder of 13 soldiers? jon: a lot of questions there. let's hope you get answers. congressman, thank you. >> i appreciate it. alisyn: here's what is happening now. joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen giving a briefing on the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the defense department budget as the military faces questions about the mounting cost of american involvement in the libyan conflict as well. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live from the pentagon for us. jennifer, what did we learn from this briefing? >> reporter: alisyn, he didn't really speak about the libyan conflict for or the cost of it. discussion was with the pentagon
and operations really pick up in places like yemen and somalia. of course, top concerns always pakistan and what's going on inside that country and north korea and perhaps the number one target, if you will, for gathering intelligence about what they are up to may well be iran. the u.s. believes iran is really trying to extend its influence in both afghanistan and iraq and around the world. there will be a lot of effort over the coming years to see what iran is up to. general petraeus in charge of all of that now as director petraeus. we will see if he gives up the nickname he had for so many years since he attended west point where his cadet, fellow cadet buddies, used to call him peaches petraeus. >> where's the peaches come from? >> you know, guys at the academy, they just sort of make stuff up. i found out recently that amongst his buddies, his fellow former cadets, many of them now two, three, four-star generals themselves, that name peaches petraeus has stuck over the years. close friends, amongst others, maybe behind his back. not too much to his face. he's often called king david petraeu
's why. how many wars are we fighting now? let's name them. afghanistan, iraq, pakistan, libya, and soon as mr. leon panetta says, we'll be fighting in iran. we have military operations all over the middle east. why can't we divert some of those funds, cut some of those wars and not cut social security because social security never impacted on our debt. social security was funded all along so why are we cutting social security? >> guest: well, let me just assure you we are not going to cut social security, okay? i think there might be efforts in the house to cut social security, and it might possibly pass, although i certainly know that the cut cap and whatever it's called won't pass because it requires a two-thirds vote and you need 50 democrats to vote for it, and i don't believe we'll have 50 democrats to vote for it, but i guarantee you if any measure passed the house of social security, it would not be taken up in the senate, and if it did, i believe the president would veto it. you know, you're a retiree, paid into social security, all of your working life, and you deserve to conti
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)